The very few pilots of the Great 'Aerial' War of 1914-18 were not just lucky.  They also used their unbelievable bravery alongside other attributes, such as Skill, experience, instinctive aggression and guile. All these terms contributed to the making of an air 'ACE'. The following is a list, in tabulation form, of all the combats that Captain Albert Ball is known to have taken part in. And where he might have claimed a moral or physical 'Victory'.​

  1. A Bristol Scout.
    A Bristol Scout.

Combat records. Date, Squadron Number, Aircraft used, Opponent Faced, Notes

April to July
August
September
October to May 1917
  1. With his parents and his former Trent College Headmaster JS Tucker. Showing the casket which contained his Freedom of Nottingham scroll.
    With his parents and his former Trent College Headmaster JS Tucker. Showing the casket which contained his Freedom of Nottingham scroll.
  2. 19th December 1916 - At the Nottingham Albert Hall - A presentation to Albert of a silver rose bowl from the people of Lenton.
    19th December 1916 - At the Nottingham Albert Hall - A presentation to Albert of a silver rose bowl from the people of Lenton.

French Legion d'Honneur, Croix de Chevalier

Notification appeared in a supplement of the London Gazette of 2 June 1917

Victoria Cross (VC)

Extract appeared in a supplement of the London Gazette of 8 June 1917

'For most conspicuous and consistent bravery from the 25th of April to the 6th of May, 1917, during which period Capt. Ball took part in twenty-six combats in the air and destroyed eleven hostile aeroplanes, drove down two out of control, and forced several others to land. In these combats Capt. Ball, flying alone, on one occasion fought six hostile machines, twice he fought five and once four. When leading two other British aeroplanes he attacked an enemy formation of eight. On each of these occasions he brought down at least one enemy. Several times his aeroplane was badly damaged, once so seriously that but for the most delicate handling his machine would have collapsed, as nearly all the control wires had been shot away. On returning with a damaged machine he had always to be restrained from immediately going out on another. In all, Captain Ball has destroyed forty-three German aeroplanes and one balloon, and has always displayed most exceptional courage, determination and skill.'

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